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History

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Companies Created

Companies Created

Professor Donovan had and continues to have the honor of working with groups of young, brilliant, creative people. He thanks them for their creation of these companies and for their inspiration to thousand of executives around the world. These companies were and are pioneers in their markets, established thousands of job, returns to investors and customers. They account for over 39 Billion in market capitalization. Over 30 companies have been formed by employees creating over 100 billion in market capitalization.

1. Cambridge Technology Group

Cambridge Technology Group

1980 2010

IMIS/AIIS/CIIS/CTG/CEE/CTG) CEO, Founder, Chairman, description 1, description 2, Executive Programs (picture), 25,000 executives, CEO Program, Technical Training, Customized Programs, Over 200 orkshops, 2010 (picture), Tools, Systems Integration (examples), Facilites Management and Maintence, application packages, Incubator (CTP, OEC, I-Cube, One wave, C-Bridge, CSP, CTG/KPMG, IBCC, Concentric Vision, ICE, CTE, CTG/IBIRSIS, CIR, Cell Exchange, Advest, Cloud Industries Health ), (picture, collegues and founde) CTG major sponsors and partners include: Hewlett Packard, Informix, Oracle, SAP, IBM, Sun, Microsoft, NCR, Informix 1, 2, Platinum, AT&T, Netscout, Pioneered and conducted workshops for rapid development and business cases for strategic applications, Pioneered fixed price fixed time and delivered over 120 systems intergrations. Incubated over 20 companies.

HISTORY:

CTG/CEE, 1980 to today

  1. Cambridge Technology Group (CTG) is the culmination of a series of successful companies which began in 1980, principally AISS (AT&T Training), CIIS (executive Programs system intergration), that built the processes, relationships, vision, and team that had and continues to have a major influence on industry and business.
  2. CTG was and is the engine that has launched 20 successful companies, pioneered and established entire markets, created major practices in all of its partners, educated over 25,000 executives in 40 countries, developed and executed over 200 workshops and 120n system intergrations. Its former employees, using the mentoring of CTG, have created over 30 companies, with market capitalization exceeding 20 billion.
  3. CTG was one of the pioneers of new business models and technology concepts including:
    1. Left/right-hand business strategy model-lazy assets
    2. Fixed price/fixed time systems integration
    3. Three tiered client server architecture
    4. Rapid development workshop process
    5. Surround architecture
    6. Unix for business applications
    7. Methodology for quantifying business cases for IT
    8. Clickable videos
    9. Correlation Engine
    10. Security in the Cloud
    11. Screen Scraping
    12. High speed parallel processing hardware for animation
    13. Cell phone business applications
    14. Internet business applications
    15. Objects, applets, for the internet
  4. Starting in 1980, AISS, the predecessor to CTG, had as its sole sponsor and customer, AT&T. In 1979, AT&T signed a decree agreement with Judge Green, divesting the local telephone services, keeping long distance service, and free to enter the computer business. In 1980, AT&T introduced the 3D Computer Series. Mr. Singleton, of AT&T, approached Professors Donovan and Madnick about training AT&T service representatives (former telecommunications service people) in computers. For five years, AISS offered a series of four 2-week courses, and developed a holistic training program. The training required the AT&T employees not only to be proficient in computers, but also marketing and sales. Hence, the courses also introduced team-building and social activities like visits to Professor Donovans farm, Boston Pops, and Harvard activities. The programs were expanded to include AT&T customers and other sponcers and received commendations from both the participants and the senior AT&T management, NCR, and Unysis.
  5. In 1987, AT&T began to phase out their computer business. AISS/CIIS reinvented itself around executive education for AT&T and it expanded its sponsors to include NCR. The focus of CTG changed from training technical people to executive education.
  6. Professor Donovan made a choice in 1990 to change his tenured faculty position at MIT from full to part time. While Professor Donovan was deeply involved with the Sloan School executive training, he was only able to influence small numbers of people. The opportunity for executive training with AT&T and NCR would allow his influence to be global and affect thousands of people.
  7. Professor Madnick, Professor Donovans partner in AIIS (picture), CIIS,Mitrol, Knoware; a friend (picture), co-author of four books, co-teacher at MIT, thesis student, teaching assistant at MIT, elected to return to full-time teaching and research at MIT, and later awared the highest MIT honor a chaired professorship.
  8. In 1990, Hewlett Packard was very successful in the medical instruments and electronics industries. Their senior management wanted to expand into the computer industry.
  9. in 1990, Mr. John Young, CEO, Mr. Lew Platt, COO, and Mr. Bill Murphy, VP of Marketing, approached Professor Donovan and had a seminal meeting in HP headquarters in Palo Alto, CA. At that meeting, it was pointed out that HP had a computer product and a proprietary operating system, MPE, which Professor Donovan recognized as a good operating system (Professor Donovan had co-authored the basic text in operating systems). IBM had MVS, Dec had VMS, and both had a large, committed customer base, with applications locked into those operating systems-stalemate with HP in a small niche market.
  10. Professor Donovan advocated that HP declare itself the Unix vendor. Unix had come from research at MIT. Project MAC had specifically developed the Multics Operating System which Professor Donovan worked on as an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering.
  11. DARPA (Defense Advance Research Project Agency) was the principal sponsor of Project MAC, which developed two major advances in computers and information systems. The first was Multics, a multi-user operating system based segmentation and paged hardware. Multics was the predecessor to Unix. The second was the DARPA Net, which evolved into the internet.
  12. The little-known of story of the birth of Unix is as follows: Multics was a joint research development effort among MIT, GE, and Bell Labs. When GE dropped their computer line in the 1970s, Ken Thompson and Dennis Richie, two developers of Multics, returned to Bell Labs. They had developed some personal applications and games under Multics and wished to run those applications back at Bell Labs. Bell Labs had a PDP7 running Decs VMS operating system, which was incompatible with Multics.
  13. What most technical people would do, is to change the application programs from Multics calls to VMS calls. What Thompson and Richie, was change the operating system on the PDP7 to a simple single-user version of Multics. When they said it quickly,--Uni Multics, the name was coined, Unix.
  14. AT&T Bell Labs adopted Unix as their standard operating system and released it to the public for free.

HPs Challenge

  1. In that 1990 seminal meeting with Professor Donovan, Mr. Young was concerned about four challenges with adopting Professor Donovans recommendation that Unix become HPs platform.
    1. What would HPs comparative advantage be if everyone could sell Unix machines? Professor Donovan said that HP would be a first-mover and would have a level playing field.
    2. HPs MPE people said their operating system was superior. Professor Donovan said, not for business.
    3. There were no business applications running on Unix. Professor Donovan said CTG would develop, with customers, and with a Rapid Development Workshop, RDW process, business applications.
    4. There was no awareness in the business market of Unix, as it was primarily an academic endeavor. Professor Donovan said CTG would educate HPs customers to business and Unix.
  2. In 1991, Mr. Young signed a contract with CTG to give executive programs to its customers. The terms of the contact was a percentage of sales, as recorded by the account executives, that resulted from the programs. After a year, the commissions due to CTG were over 126 million dollars for four programs!. Mr. Young and Professor Donovan agreed to modify the contract for these highly successful programs to a long-term contract at $275,000 per course and no commission. Most importantly, Professor Donovan was allowed to jointly market the products and services of his subsequent companies along with HPs products and services in the programs.

Innovative Demonstration in Executive Programs

  1. Responding to executive skepticism in the classroom, specifically CEOs, as to the value of IT in their organizations, Professor Donovan introduced a dramatic offering in the programs. On the first day of a two-day program, Professor Donovan would challenge the 100+ executives there to give his demonstration team (picture of one team) a business problem that they had been working on for at least 3 years, spent at least $5 million on, and his demonstration team would implement a pilot,with input from the chosen executive (picture) and developed a business case overnight (picture). The next morning, with the participating executive, the team would demonstrate the solution. This would not only bring an emotional response from the participants, and added credibility and relevance, but resulted in many immediate sales for HP and the workshops, Tools, and system intergrations of Professor Donovans other companies.

System Integration

  1. In 1982 CTG started performing total system integration for customers. CTG would implement the solutions demonstrated in class and then in the workshops
  2. By 1990 CTG had a sucessful profitable business ( 1990 audited financials ) with a full offering of education, implemented over 120 successful systems (there exist video tapes of over 100 workshops.(example scooter store) tools, applications, and facilities management.
  3. Today each of CTG sponsors have copied CTG process . and created major service practices. eg. Oracle, IBM, HP.
  4. CTG developed a unique recruiting process, mentoring and selection. CTG invites 100 recent graduating students at a time to a one day lecture/interview/questions session. Then choose the most suitable - nice, smart, technology friendly, team player. CTG employees were most thankful for the opportunity. CTG employees had interactions with senior executives but also extremely strong team time in such trips to Bermuda., Seagate
  5. This highly-successful, contractual relationship with HP, was good for the customers (see sample from 25000 feedback form and letters), good for HP (see HP''s return on investment analysis part 1, part 2), and was good for CTG and its spin-off companies. HP, in one year alone, made over $1.12 billion in sales part 1, part 2, or 5% of its total sales, through these programs.
  6. The same sales generation model of executive programs, sponsored by vendors, was contracted for with CTG from the following companies with similar excellent returns: Oracle, SAP 1997, SAP 1998, Unisys, Dec, Sun, IBM, Informix, Lawson, AIG., HP
  7. Over twenty companies were formed within CTG based on the needs expressed by attendees of the executive programs. After they were profitable, the companies became separate entities e.g.CTP., OEC

2. Cambridge Technology Partners (CTP/CTG)

ctp

1990-2010

Founder, Chairman, IPO 1993, S-1, #1 Growth, merge with Novell 2001 (picture with Pete Musser Co-Chairman giving award for successful IPO, Mary Jo) (Bob Crandell CEO, American Airlines, early systems integration adopter within CTG) Founded as a profitable system integration division of Cambridge Technology Group, CTGI, in 1983- 1990 . Pioneer of fixed-price, fixed-time, UNIX-based business systems development serving fortune 500 (picture) with 132 employees (picture CTG in 1988) .Became a separate company,,CTG transfered the needed assetts in 1991 and renamed Cambridge Technology Partners IPO in 1993 at $5.00/per share, rose to $70.00 in 1996. Merged with Novell (NASDAQ: NOVL), 6000 + employees, in 2008 the switzerland ctp branch of Novel spun out, under the leadership of Vijay Srinivasan, in Switzerland as Cambridge Technology Partners, (picture Founders CTP - Howard Klodney, Linda Chow and John).

HISTORY:

CTP, 1986 to today:

Business Environments

  • The 1980s was a time of deregulation, mergers, and acquisitions, hence efficiencies and effectiveness could only be gained if satisfactory mergers of systems, people, and organizations were made.
  • Integration of IT systems were difficult and costly.

Technology Environment

MVS/CICS

  • In the 1980s, enterprise computing was dominated by IBM mainframes with the operating system MVS/CICS. These systems were designed to handle secure, reliable, high transaction volume, stable business applications. They were expensive; it was time consuming and costly to make changes. For example, typically once a week the system would be taken down, changes made, and the new system brought up. A long approval process preceded any changes.

VM, Virtual machine:

  • With the introduction by IBM of the VM operating system in the 1980s, it was possible for an IT department to simultaneous run several development environments. Hence, while changes were still disruptive, the old system could continue to run as the new system was being brought up. VM was developed at the Cambridge Scientific Center, under the leadership of Mr. Norman Rasmuson, with contributions from Professor Donovan and Stuart Madnick. The operating system was initially developed in the 1970s to observe performance of programs running underneath it and was called CP (Cambridge Program). It was later renamed VM, as IBM did not want to distinguish any of their scientific centers over others.

CMS

  • Subsequently, a single-user time-sharing system was developed at the Cambridge Scientific Center with the same team in the late 1970s. The system was called CMS (Cambridge Monitor System), later renamed Conversational Monitor System by IBM.

IBM Timesharing System

  • In each virtual machine, one CMS system would be running, hence creating an over-all system where many users were running in a time-shared mode on the same computer. VM is further discussed in Virtual Machines by Donovan and Madnick.

Unix-Development and Connectivity Environment

  • At CTG, in 1983, Howard Klodney, Professor Donovan, and Linda Chow, were struggling with how to interconnect separate applications running on separate computers. The struggle was a result of many of the participants in CTG executive programs requesting interconnectivity for the merged companies. CTG wanted to find and demonstrate a solution
  • Professor Donovan, Howard dialed into one application through a 3270 terminal and then, by hand, dialed into another system using another terminal. In a breakthrough moment, Professor Donovan asked Howard-can we simulate a terminal dialing into a computer and have that simulation do the same keystrokes as a person?

Surround and Screen-Scraping

  • Howard wrote that simulation, which became of one of the first screen-scraping programs for business use. We called it Easy Connect, and later developed an entire architecture, Surround which allowed for the interconnectivity of applications.

CTG Systems Integration Division

CTP Formation

  • In 1990, Pet Musser attended a CTG CEO seminar. , Professor Donovan developed a personal relationship, and then a business relationship with Mr. Pete Musser( picture ), CEO and Founder of Safeguard. Safeguard was a rights-offering company that helped other companies to go public.
  • In 1990 professor Donovan had a plan in place (prospectus) to spin off the highly profitable and growing systems integration division of CTG which was valued at 80 million dollars. Pete Musser suggested, alternatively, that Professor Donovan spin off the CTG systems integration division,using safegard as a vechicle for a rights offering then a public offering as it was highly profitable, had excellent customers, had technologies, and, especially, an outstanding team of some 200 employees.
  • Pete assigned Don Caldwell, a former banker who was on leave due to the S&L crisis, to do the due-diligence. Don concluded that it was a great business and should be set on a path to a public offering. The new company was renamed the division CTP, Cambridge Technology Partners, to retain the brand name of CTG.
  • For the new division of CTG and subsequent company CTP, Professor Donovan needed to recruit senior managers. There were two strong candidates. Jim Sims, who was most eager . Mort Myerson (picture), former president of EDS, which had been sold to GM. Mort had the advantage of proven experience. Jim had the support of Pete Musser. In 1991, Professor Donovan hired Jim Simms to head the systems integration division at CTG, because of Petes support and Jims eagerness and expressed desire to work with Professor Donovan, as stated in Sims letter of December, 1990.
  • Also in 1991, Professor Donovan hired Robert Gett as VP of Technology for CTG. Mr. Gett and the CTG team trained by Professor Donovan were effective in delivering systems.
  • 1991 Professor Donovan formed CTP "Based on CTG ''s completion of 120 successful integration projects, Dr.Donovan led the formation of Cambridge Technology Partners (CTP), a firm dedicated to the rapid deployment of strategic applications using open systems technology."-as is documented in Cambridge Technology Partners Literature
  • In 1991, Professor Donovan transferred the profitable CTG division to CTP. CTP was poised at its inception for high-growth, as documented by the 1991 CTG Capital Contribution Agreement and payment, and Sponsor Contract Amendments (HP1992) (HP1991). The transfer included:
    1. An ongoing profitable company which had earned $8 from 1988 to 1990.
    2. 132 trained systems integration, marketing, sales, and administrative personnel.
    3. Maintenance revenue from systems for over ten fortune 1000 customers.
    4. Over ten systems under development for fortune 1000 customers.
    5. Proprietary tools and application software.

Workshop contracts from HP and Unisys:

  • 20. IN 1991 Professor Donovan Chairman of CTP, Jim Simms became President, and Robert Gett became COO. In 1992, Professor Donovan became Co-Chairman with Pete Musser. In 1993, with strong management in place, Professor Donovan left CTP to focus on OEC.
  • 21. CTP went public in 1993 and with the CTG good foundation, customers, team, continued to grow to a market cap of $3 billion over the next ten years. CTP was listed by the Boston Globe as the top New England high-tech company in revenue and profit growth in the mid-1990s.
  • 22. Professor Donovan sold his shares of CTP at $2.50 share. After the public offering, the share price rose to $70.

 

3. Cambridge Technology Enterprises

cte

1998-2004

Founder, Holdings, ( Cambridge Technology Group, Cambridge Technology Partners, Borland International, Inc, CenterPoint, I-CUBE, Internet Business Services, ICE, Brainstrom, WorldStreet, Marathon Technologies, Interactive Gaming and Communication (IGC), Purchase Net, Office 2000, CIT), Management Team (picture Co-founder Sundar Subramaniam)

  1. CTE was a holding company providing infrastructure and CTG marketing channel to its companies Significant returns were made
  2. John Donovan III Director, Co-founder, Sundar Subramaniam Co-founder.
  3. CTE became the predecessor to IBCC.

4. Cambridge Executive Enterprises (CEE/CTG)

ctg

1991-2007

Founder, Chairman, CEE expanded CTG''s business internationally, content, sponsors, lecturers Executive Programs, Workshops,systems integration, tools, applications, Sponsored Oracle, Unisys, (picture President, Joe Tucci, CEO, James Unrue) IBM, SAP, Cingular (Ken Young), CITI Corp, Lawson, Informix, HP, Parametric (picture Lou Platt CEO), Samsung (Chairman) (picture, 1995 CTG/CEE outing)

HISTORY:

CEE, 1991 to today:

Business Environment

  • CEOs and CFOs were not in harmony in the late 1980s. Globalization, complex government regulation, the military need to function more like a business, and the needs of customers required responsive organizations and rapidly adaptable technology.

Technology Environment

  • Massive changes were occurring, including introduction of the internet, multi-media, high-speed computing.

History

  1. Cambridge Executive Enteprises, CEE, continued the tradition of CTG, executive education, rapid development workshops, incubation, and developed partnerships with companies to implement the technologies demonstrated by CEE.
  2. The executive courses became more international, spanning over 40 countries. The course topics broadened to incorporate such important areas as: corporate ethics, economics, negotiations, change-management, multi-media, business models, and cases. These topics were presented by Professor Donovan and colleagues from MIT, Harvard,Yale, and leaders of industries, including (their backgrounds, topics, and courses are discribed in a program for CEO, Key Executives, AT&T, strategic computing).
    1. Professor Roger Fisher, Harvard Law School, Negotiations
    2. Professor Joseph Badarracco, Harvard Business School, Corporate Ethics
    3. Dean Albert Carnesale, Harvard University, Kennedy School Dean, State of Education
    4. President Neil Rudenstein, Harvard University President, History of College Education
    5. Professor Bill Hogan, Harvard Kennedy School, Energy Policy
    6. Professor Roger Porter, Harvard Kennedy School, Center for Business and Government Director, Economic Advisor to Presidents Regan and Bush, Economic Productivity
    7. Dean Graham Allison, Harvard Kennedy School Dean, Nuclear Proliferation
    8. Professor Robert Reich, Harvard Kennedy School, Secretary of Labor, Role of Government
    9. Dean Richard Cavanaugh, Harvard Kennedy School Associate Dean, Challenges of Education and Government
    10. Professor James Cash, Harvard Business School, Corporate IT
    11. Professor Richard Noland, Harvard Business School, Business Cycles
    12. Professor Roger Lawrence, Harvard University, Relationships with Canada
    13. Dr Graig Fields, Harvard Faculty, Chief Scientest DARPA emerging technologies
    14. Professor Theodore Levitt, Harvard Business School, Marketing
    15. Professor James L. McKenney, Harvard Business School, issues facing the senior executives
    16. John J. Donovan, Harvard Business School, School of Arts and Sciences, Doctorate canidate Left / right strategies
    17. Teaching Fellow Linda J Donovan MPP,Harvard Kenedy School, government and economist
    18. Professor Rakesh Khurana, Harvard Business School, colleague MIT and CTP
    19. Dr Arno A. Penzias, Nobel Prize Laureate, Bell Labs, Big Bang Theory
    20. Professor Thomas McGuire, Harvard Medical School, Effective uses of Medical Data
    21. Dean Holly T. Sargent, Deputy Dean, Harvard Kennedy School, Senior Philanthropic Advisor Harvard, Oxford
    22. Professor Randall Davis, MIT Sloan School of Management, Knowledge Based Systems
    23. Professor Paul MacAvoy, MIT, Yale, Counsel of Economic Advisors, Regulation and Deregulation
    24. Professor Jack Rockart, MIT Sloan School, Director Center for Information Systems, Critical Success Factors
    25. Professor Nicholas Negroponte, MIT, Multi-media
    26. Profesor Randy Davis, MIT Sloan School
    27. Dean Abraham Siegle, MIT Sloan School
    28. Professor Stuart Madnick, MIT, Database Technology
    29. Mary Jo Donovan, Bovich MBA, Sloan School of Management, AT&T
    30. Professor J. C. R. Licklider, MIT, E. E., Project nMAC
    31. Professor Hoo-Min Toong, MIT Sloan School
    32. Professor Sundar Subramaniam, Adjunct Professor Economics Brandeis, MIT Sloan ''06, technologies for business, Harvard Medical
    33. Dean James Nondof, B.S. Yale ''90, Admissions, President CTG (photograph with John, Yale, ''94)
    34. President Benno Schmidt, B.A., LLD, Yale, Yale President Challendes of the Decade
    35. Dr. David Morrison, PhD, Change Management
    36. Professor Marvin A. Sirbu, Carnegie Mellon University, telecommunications technologies and policies
    37. Dr Leonard Kleinrock, University of California, Los Angeles, advanced telecommunications and computer networks
    38. Mr. John Reed, CEO, Citicorp, MIT Sloan Board Member, Banking and IT
    39. Mr. Robert Allen, CEO, AT&T
    40. Mr. Charles Brown, Chairman, AT&T
    41. Ian M. Ross, President bell Laboratories
    42. Mr. Lew Platt, Chairman and CEO, Hewlett Packard
    43. Mr. James Unrue, Chairman, Unisys
    44. Mr. Ray Lane, CEO, Oracle Corporation
    45. Mr. Hasso Platner, Founder, CEO, SAP
    46. Mr. Robert Palmer, CEO, DEC
    47. Mr. Terrasoa, CEO, HP Japan
    48. Mr. Peter Van Der Fluit, Director, HP Europe
    49. General Keith Kellogg, CTO DOD, Director J6
    50. Mr Jeremy Coates, president SAP America
    51. Admiral Bud Langston, US Navy
  3. Five-day technical workshops were also broadened similarly and included a lecture by one of the above academic colleagues.
  4. All programs were customized based on participant responses to a questionnaire prior to the program. Over 25,000 participants completed these questionnaires.
  5. Feedback forms were completed by the 25,000 participants to help the sponsors and continue to improve the programs.
  6. The tradition of an overnight implementation of a participants challenge continued. The mega-demos received spectacular praise.

5. CATLABS

ctg
sap
1997-2002

Chairman,Cofounded sundar Subramaniam, John Donovan III (picture)

History

  1. 1. in 1997 Catlabs was founded as Joint Venture with SAP to add value to service to existing applications.
  2. 2. Catlabs used CTG as its principle marketing vehicle.
  3. 3 In 2002 Ccatlabs was absorbed into CEE/CTG.

7. Open Environment Corporation (OEC)

oec

1992-1996

Co-founder, Chairman, CEO Sundar Subramaniam, Pioneered three tierd software architecture, products included tools to build applications using DCE standards. IPO 1995, S-1, famous board (Harvard Provost,Yale Dean, MIT Prof. John III, Sundar) merged Borland 1996 (Picture at beginnings Sundar, John, Russell Clark)

HISTORY:

OEC, 1990 to today:

Business Environment

  • In the 1990s, the business environment was changing rapidly, multiple and diverse users within and outside organizations needed access to information; traditional IT technology could not keep up.

Technology Environment

  • 1. A new standard of communication between applications, DCE, emerged.

History

  1. Sundar Subramaniam, a honors graduate of Brandeis University, with a degree in Economics, joined CTG in 1991. Sundar was one of four CTG employees who stayed with CTG when CTP was separated. This was the start of a twenty-year partnership between Sundar and Professor Donovan. Together, they have started 15 companies, the first of which was OEC.
  2. Professor Donovan developed the concept of 3-Tiered Architecture, introduced in his SURROUND architecture, whereby the presentation layer was separated from functionality and the data layers.
  3. Sundar advocated that DCE standards could be used to communicate among these three layers, and designed the tools to construct applications using this architecture.
  4. John Donovan III (Picture) was co-founder and initial president.
  5. CTE financed two million dollars later raised 8 million in venture capital in 1994. John Donovan helped recruite management team and board,
  6. By the end of 1994 OEC had 14 million in revenues he facilitated the public offering and merger with Borland.
  7. Open Solution (Open Tec) was formed in 1991 as a division of CTG and funded by CTG with projected financials for 1992 of 16,328,437.
  8. OEC was formally formed in 1993 with Professor Donovan as chairman, Sundar Subramaniam as president and CEO, Maureen Donovan Lance as tresurer (Picture).
  9. CTG in behalf of OEC entered into contracts with Unilever for tools and HP and IBM for tools and service.
  10. In 1993 and all assetts, tools, contracts, customers of the Open Solutions division of CTG were transfered to OEC Its products, archecture, sucesses, contracts are described in "CTG and OEC product and services".
  11. OEC developed and sold the tools to IT departments. CTG remained the principal marketing and customer-generation engine for OEC.
  12. There was a controversy among IT professionals concerned whether 2 or 3-tiered architecture was better. Gartner Group took the position that 2-tiered was preferable; HP continued to promote 3-tiers.
  13. OECs success was due to CTG and OEC marketing which lead to the subsequent adoption of 3-tiered architecture for business applications and became the development environment for many Fortune 1000 companies, as well as the business architecture on the internet, where the browser became the presentation layer. OECs early adopter was Unilever, as supported by James Duckworth, CIO.
  14. OEC went public in 1995 at a market cap of $250 million, and was one of the most successful IPOs of 1995 with strong management,board, and 142 employees.
  15. Sundar remained CEO, Professor Donovan as Chairman until Nathan Morton (former President CompUSA, Home Depot) became president when the company went public in 1995 with strong financial see audited. OEC merged with Borland (NASDAQ: BOL).
  16. OEC completed a merger with Borland in 1997 with a combined nasdaq market cap of seven hundred and sixy four million.

8. Cambridge Migration Management

cmm

1993-1996

Co-founder predecessor to i-cube

HISTORY:

Cambridge Migration Management, 1993-1996:

Business Environment

  • In 1992-1993, the U.S. experienced a mild recession. Organizations were concerned about costs, and believed IT costs had to be reduced.

Technology Environment

  • Client-server hardware evolved from mini-computers to become nearly as powerful as mainframes.

History

  • CTG sponsors, HP, Sun, NCR, and Unisys wanted to sell their client-server hardware to the customers who attended CTG executive programs.
  • These customers had large investments in their mainframes, and their applications were difficult and costly to update to new business needs.
  • CMM was established as a subdivision of CTG to help customers migrate their applications to a less costly and more flexible hardware platform. Applications were redesigned for a 3-tier client server environment as part of the migration process.
  • CTGs rapid-application-development, RAD workshops enabled the customer to define and implement new business functions while doing the migration.
  • In 1996, a new company, I-CUBE, was formed to develop tools to perform the migrations efficiently, and to provide migration services. CMM was dissolved.

9. Integration International Inc. (I-Cube)

icube

1996-2000

Lecturer, CTG marketing, IPO 1999, migration of applications from main frames to client server architecture, Merge with Razorfish 1998, Microsoft 2007 (picture Chairman Sundar, President Peel)

HISTORY:

I-CUBE, 1996 - 2000:

Business Environment

  • The mid-1990s saw a need for inexpensive IT, and flexibility to keep up with the ever-changing business environment.

Technology Environment

  • 3-Tier, client-server architecture had become the standard.
  • Robust graphic-user interfaces and tools for building clients were readily available.
  • Inexpensive database management software on inexpensive computers became available.

History

  • I-CUBE was formally formed (document 1, document 2) on October 27, 1992
  • I-CUBE was formed to migrate applications from the mainframe to the less expensive and more flexible client-server environment, with the addition of new business functions.
  • A group of former CTG and CTP employees founded I-CUBE, including Professor Donovan, Sundar Subramanian Chairman, Madhav Anand as President, Stefan, Yannis Doganis, Gary Mckikian, and Edoyard (Eddie) Aslanian.
  • CTG executive programs were the initial marketing engine for customer generation, as was the case with CTP and OEC.
  • Wisconsin Power and Light, after attending a CTG program, became the first migration project. Generalization of the specific migration needs of this company led to development of the I-CUBE tools.
  • A formal arrangement was established between CTG and its sponsor, HP, to have I-CUBE sell their migration services in the CTG executive seminars.
  • I-CUBE was profitable every year from its inception.
  • As with CTP and OEC, before taking I-CUBE public, the management team searched for senior personnel, experienced in the financial markets. Michael Peihl was hired as President, and Bagliotti as Chief Financial Officer.
  • I-CUBE went public in 1998 with a market cap of $600 million, and was merged with Razorfish in 1999. combined NASDAQ market cap $3.34 Billion
  • Razorfish was bought by Microsoft in 2007.
  • All funding was provided by I-CUBE employees, who received the growth in value.

10. Cambridge Samsung Partners

ctgsamsung

1994-2000

(CSP), Co-founder, President,focused on developing advanced technologies for products, merged with Samsung 1996 (picture, Signing, Team)

HISTORY:

Cambridge Samsung Partners, 1994-2000:

Business Environment

  • Asia faced a financial crisis.

Technology Environment

  • The internet was maturing, cell-phone and chip technology was exploding.

Chairman Lee

In 1994, Professor Donovan developed a business and personal relationship with Chairman Lee of Samsung.( picture )

history

  1. Professor Donovan gave an executive seminar in Korea for HP/Samsung.(picture) In addition, Chairman Lee requested a seminar for his senior executives.(picture ) In this executive seminar, Professor Donovan demonstrated opportunities for Samsung on the internet.
  2. In the mid-1990s, Samsung was one of the most profitable technology companies on the planet. They represented over 10% of the GDP of Korea. They achieved this excellence through continually reinventing the company.
  3. Chairman Lee recognized that CTG and CTE vehicles for innovation. He and his executives proposed a joint venture to explore new technologies and their applicability for new Samsung products.
  4. In 1994, the joint venture CTG/Samsung was formed,(signing picture) with Professor Donovan as President, John Donovan, Jr., Sundar Subramanian, and Dr. Keisig Lee of Samsung as Managing Directors.
  5. 25 million committed, 50/50 joint venture privately held
  6. Six investments in start ups
  7. In 2000, the company was merged with Samsung.

11. Cambridge Technology Group/KPMG Partnership

ctg
kpmg

1996-1999

Co-founder, CTG in Europe, merged with KPMG

HISTORY:

KPMG/CTG, 1996-1999:

Business Environment

  • KPMG, an accounting firm saw the need to expand into value-added services, such as systems integration. Senior management of European companies needed to be educated as to the value of IT for strategic use.

Technology Environment

  • The processes of CTG, seminars, workshops, and systems integration, were well developed, proven and accepted.

History

  1. In 1995, Aegon executives (picture CEO) attended a CTG/HP program in the Netherlands, which resulted in a workshop and two systems integration projects.
  2. In 1996, Professor Donovan developed a business and personal relationship with Paul Van de Geijn of Aegon.
  3. The success of CTG in the Netherlands sparked KPMGs interested in establishing a systems integration subdivision, using CTGs 3-tier, client-server model.
  4. In 1996, KPMG and CTG formed a joint venture called KPMG/CTG or KPMG/CTE, founded by Professor Donovan, Ron Wiensteakers, President, Anand Daga, and Sundar Subramanian.
  5. 50/50 Joint Venture -in Europe
  6. KPMG/CTG bought the CTG interest in 1999. The company remains profitable.

12. Internet Business Capital Corporation (prospectus)

ibcc

1999-2010

Co-founder, Chariman Advisory Committee, incubator, (with Sundar)

HISTORY:

IBCC, 1999-2010, ongoing:

Business Environment

  • Entrepreneurship throughout the U.S. was flourishing. The need for innovative solutions in such fields as medicine and security were pressing. However, the young entrepreneur lacked access to capital and physical and business infrastructure.

Technology Environment

  • New technologies were being developed at a rapid rate. The internet had become a mass-distribution market.

History

  • In 1999, Professor Donovan and Sundar Subramaniam founded IBCC to incubate new technology companies.
  • Ray Lane, of Oracle, and Paul van de Geijn, of Aegon joined Professor Donovan and Sundar Subramaniam as investors.
  • To date, over twenty companies have been incubated successfully the most recent in the area of medical data .

13. Concentric Vision

concentric vision

1999-2001

Co-founder, with Sundar multi media management,, merged with Advent Group (picture Sundar and John) (Business Overview)

HISTORY:

Concentric Visions, 1999-2001:

Business Environment

  • Personalization of business interfaces on the internet was thriving.

Technology Environment

  • Bandwidth was increasing, streaming media, multi-media and flash technologies were widely available.

History

  • Beginning in 1997, Professor Donovan and his demonstration team incorporated the use of videos in enterprise-wide internet solutions in CTGs executive seminars. For example, they developed the ability to click on a basketball in a basketball game video to initiate a purchase of a basketball.
  • Initiating a purchase process from any appearance of the basketball throughout the video was complex.
  • In 1999, Professor Donovan and Sundar Subramaniam formed Concentric Visions as a subdivision of CTG to produce tools to manage multi-media applications. CTG, in its executive seminars, produced the first customers, U.S. Navy, Cingular, Sears, I-group;
  • Partners -CTG facilitated- including Oracle, Primus, Crossmark
  • Five provisional Patents filed Technological development : a platform, service
  • Within CTG, the concept of using videos to add business value through internet advertisements was further developed. Technology was developed to place clickable advertisements in video games, and a patent written by CTG, but never completed.
  • In 2001, Concentric Visions merged with ___.

14. Integrated Computing Engine (ICE)

ice

1994-2000

Corporate Overview, Founding Investor with MIT,high speed work stations, merged with Media (Picture Mr. Okawa CEO Sega, Sundar President, Donovan at signing of investment)

HISTORY:

ICE, 1994 - 2000:

Business Environment

  • In the early 1990s, the internet saw exponential growth in the number of users and intensity of use.
  • Animated films required high-speed computing for graphics.

Technology Environment

  • MIT Lincoln Laboratories developed inexpensive, massive, parallel computing, particularly suitable for high-transaction and graphic computing.

History

  1. ICE was a project developed at MITs Lincoln Laboratory in 1983 and formally incorporated in 1994. The project team developed advanced, high-speed parallel processing hardware.
  2. In 1993, Professor Donovan began demonstrating this hardware in his executive programs for such applications as graphic and high-volume internet transactions.
  3. Professor Donovan and Sundar Subramaniam developed a relationship between CTG and Lincoln Laboratory (ICE). CTG coordinated funding, provided access to customers, and developed applications. (32) Sundar became president of ICE. (33)
  4. CTE provided $1 of finan, John Donovan III and Sundar negociated technology licence from MIT
  5. Revenues in 1998 $10 million, 60 employees privately held
  6. In 1993, CTG delivered several executive programs in Asia, including two in Japan (picture of Japan team). Japanese programs were mainly presented to CEOs of major firms, including the CSK family, which owns a systems integration firm and Sega Toys.
  7. Sega Toys became an early adopter and its president, Okawa, a major investor.
  8. ICE merged with Media in 2000.

15. C-Bridge Internet Solutions

cbridge

1996-2000

Co-founder, with Sundar, IPO 1999, S-1, building business applications on the web, merged with Excelon, Progress Software (picture with President, Bellini)

HISTORY:

C-Bridge Internet Solutions, 1996-2000:

Business Environment

  • In the mid-1990s, businesses sought efficient marketing, sales, ordering, inventory, and supply-chain management.

Technology Environment

  • The internet had become global and pervasive.

History

  1. Demonstrations in CTG executive programs used the internet for enterprise applications, including interfaces with enterprise software, such as SAP, Lawson, or customized mainframe software.
  2. From 1994 to 1996, a CTG team led by Sundar Subramaniam, developed the solutions demonstrated in the executive programs sponsored by HP and Oracle. The participants of these programs became early adopters of these solutions.
  3. C-Bridge was formed as a subsidiary of CTG in 1995. Professor Donovan and Sundar Subramaniam were Co-founders.
  4. John Donovan III became President CTE financed $3 million.
  5. In 1996 Sundar became President. C-Bridge became a pioneer of large-scale enterprise applications on the internet.
  6. C-Bridge was incorporated in 1996, and the processes, tools, assets, employees, and customers of the CTG division were transferred to C-Bridge.
  7. Cogisent, an Indian systems integration company, made a formal offer to merge with C-Bridge for 30% of the stock of Cogisent, whereby C-Bridge would become its North-American presence. The offer was turned down by Mr Belini,President .
  8. CTG brokered partnerships with HP and CTG customers to facilitage C-Bridge''s marketing as with CTP, OEC.
  9. In 1997, Professor Donovan and Sundar Subramaniam hired Joe Belini, a former I2 executive, who brought the company public in 1999.
  10. 10. In 1996 C-Bridge had revenues of 10 million and 60 employees in 1998 C-Bridge had 230 employees and a NASDAQ market cap of $800 million.
  11. In 2000, C-Bridge merged with Excelon (NASDQ EXL), which merged with Progess (PRGS) in 2004.

16. Cambridge Information Technology (CIT) India

cit_india
1996

Co-founder Sundar Subramaniam (picture)

17. Cambridge Technology Group/IBIRSIS

ctg
gas natural fenosa

1996-1999

Co-founder, CTG in South America, merged with IBIRSIS, division of Union Fenosa, merged with Gas Natural Fenosa (picture)

HISTORY:

Ibirsis/CTG, 1996-1999:

Business Environment

  • South America was growing economically. CTG was successful in delivering executive education programs, workshops, systems integration projects in Argentina, Chile, Brazil, and Peru.

Technology Environment

  • CTGs processes and tools were robust, and leaders in the market.

History

  1. In 1996, Ibirsis wanted to developed an SI capability in South America.
  2. The customers of CTG in South America wanted a local company to develop and maintain systems.
  3. In 1996, Ibirsis/CTG was formed to give CTG executive programs and workshops, and to provide systems integration and maintenance in South America.
  4. CTG processes, tools, and customers were transferred to the joint venture.
  5. 50 /50 owned Ibirsis /CTE in South America
  6. In 1999, Ibirsis bought the joint venture.

 

18. OneWave

one wave

1993-1998

(Formerly Business@Web, Object Power), Co-founder with Sundar, John Donovan III, Chairman, IPO 1995, S-1, tools for web applications, merged with Primex (picture Sundar Co-founder)

HISTORY:

OneWave, 1993-1998:

Business Environment

  • Consumers and businesses wanted to expand business on the internet.

Technology Environment

  • Programming of applications for the internet was slow and tedious.
  • Object technologies had matured.

History

  • In the early 1990s, Professor Donovan challenged participants of CTG executive programs to describe a system their company had spent two years and over $1 million working to develop. The CTG demonstration team would then develop a pilot and business case overnight.
  • Key to the accomplishment was that the demonstration team developed a set of objects, like Lego blocks, that could be mixed and matched to quickly develop applications on the internet.
  • These technologies and implementations were first placed in a sucessful division of CTG called Object Power. James Nondorf, President of CTG, became Director of the division. John Donovan III President
  • In 1994, Object Power was incorporated as a separate company named Business @ Web. Professor Donovan and Sundar Subramaniam were co-founders, Sundar was Chairman, and James Nondorf was President. All tools, employees, and customers, of Object Power were transferred to Business @ Web.
  • CTE provided $2 million in financing
  • 1994 revenues were $6 million
  • In 1996, Professor Donovan and Sundar hired Klaus Bessier, formerly of SAP, to take the company public and become President. Bessier renamed the company OneWave.
  • OneWaves products included OpenScape (37), and were well received.
  • CTG provided partners, including HP, and initial customers.
  • OneWave went public in 1999, on the NASDAQ exchange $60 million wcompany financing was raised
  • In 1998 renamed Primix with a NASDaq market cap of $104 million (Picture of signing merger agreement)

19. Cambridge Technology Report

ctr

1989-1992

Co-founder and Executive Editor.John Donovan III President, treasurer. reporting of sucessful CTG applications to fortune 2,000 companies, merged into CTG.

HISTORY:

Cambridge Technology Reports, 1989-1992:

Business Environment

  • IT was not perceived by the CEO as a strategic tool.

Technology Environment

  • CTG had developed strategic applications for business with the CIOs.

History

  • In 1996, CTR was formed as a division within CTG to research the progress of its systems integration projects. Many successes were documented and presented in the executive programs.
  • CTR was incorporated in 1989 to publish reports of these successes.
  • CTR subscribers included over 200 international Fortune 2000 companies (39)
  • Other research companies, like Gartner Group and Forester, grew to take over the role of reporting technologies in strategic applications.
  • In 1992, CTR merged once again with CTG, providing internal research.

20. CellExchange

cell exchange

2000-2010

Chairman Emeritus and Coach, government systems, merged with CTE (picture Bhaskar Panigrahi, CEO & Demo Team)

HISTORY:

CellExchange, 2000-2003:

Business Environment

  1. Employees began spending more of their work time outside the office. They needed effective communication and access to information.
  2. The U.S. was attacked by terrorists on September 11, 2001.
  3. US Navy needed better H R

Technology Environment

  1. Mobile devices became sophisticated and programmable.
  2. Wireless commercial networks became available to support mobile devices.

History

  1. In 1998, CTGs demonstrations of business solutions to participants in executive programs made extensive use of mobile devices, pioneering their use for business.
  2. A subsidiary of CTG implemented wireless solutions for early adopters, Scooter Store and JEA.
  3. In 2000, this subsidiary became a new company named CellExchange, and CTGs technology, customers, contracts, and partnerships were transferred.
  4. CTG facilitated Global Parnerships eg. China with its parners.
  5. From 2000 to 2001, the company delivered several successful projects and developed an architecture and tools.
  6. In 2001, CellExchange purchased a systems integration company headed by Bhaskar P, and his CFO and technical team. Bhaskar became president of CellExchange.
  7. Following September 11, Professor Donovan and CTG worked with General Kellogg and General Myers of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to develop a system to detect terrorism.
  8. In 2002, CTG conducted a successful workshop with participants from DOD, the Pentagon, FBI, CIA, Northern Command, Coast Guard, TSA, the White House, MITRE. The resulting prototype, business case, and architecture supported an innovative concept of correlating massive amounts of data gathered from military bases and government agencies, correlating the data to find anomalies, and alerting the appropriate people. The prototype was name PROTECT AMERICA. The prototype by Professor Donovans demonstration team and General Kelloggs DOD team to the White House, Secretary of Defense, FBI Director, President of MITRE.
  9. In 2002, Secretary Rumsfelt renamed PROTECT AMERICA, calling it JPEN, Joint Protection E N. General Myers approved the deployment of JPEN to 30 military installations including the Pentagon.
  10. CTG selected CellExchange to implement the JPEN system.
  11. In 2006, the JPEN technology was transferred to the Northern Command system and became classified.
  12. Cell Exchange recieved the highest certification for it software development and clariences.
  13. CellExchange sucessfully delivered several large systems, including the Navy Five-Vector Model.
  14. Cell Exchange proposals were very complete, describing their unique capabilities and their partners.
  15. In 2003, CellExchange was bought by CTE. CTE was a publicly traded company on the Indian exchange, and was financed by IBCC.
  16. In 2010, CTEs Federal Systems Division was bought by CTG.

21. Advest

ctg
westinghouse

1990-1992

Co-founder, assembled real time advertisement data for analysis, merged with Westinghouse

HISTORY:

Advest, 1990-1992:

Business Environment

  • Radio and television advertisement were important but little data existed to measure effectiveness.

Technology Environment

  • CTGs SURROUND architecture enabled data-gathering from many sources.

History

  1. In 1990, a joint venture between CTG and Westinghouse was formed to provide services to organizations that advertised on radio and television that would measure the effectiveness of those ads.
  2. In 1992, Westinghouse purchased CTGs interest.

22. Cambridge Institute for Information System (CIIS)

ctg

1983-1985

Co-founder with Professor Madnick, Chairman, AT&T training and Executive Program,system intergration, tools, applications (Sponsors AT&T CEO, Brown), broaden offerings globally, merged with CTG (with partner Professor Stuart Madnick)

23. Institute for Medical Information Services (IMIS)

ctg

1978-1983/p>

Co-founder with Professor Madnick, Chairman, President. executive programs, training, system''s integration merged with CTG (with collegue Professor Stuart Madnick)

HHISTORY:

  • Predecessors to CTG: Institute for Medical Information Services, AIIS, Cambridge Institute for Information Systems, 1983-1985:

History

  • Institute for Medical Information Services, AIIS, Cambridge Institute for Information Systems were formed in 1978, 1983, and 1994. They were predecessors to CTG and were merged with one another and then CTG.

24. Financial Publishing Co

fpo

1972-1980

Member of Board of Directors

25. Mitrol

mitrol

1971-1973

Chairman, Co-founder, with Harold Adler (picture with Adler, Son James in 1973),on line inventory management system, merged with GE 1973, GE spun it out as MITROL

HISTORY:

Mitrol, (MIT Control), 1971-2010:

Business Environment

  • Manufacturing companies needed to improve efficiency to be competitive within local and global markets.

Technology Environment

  • Relational database systems were becoming industrial strength.

History

  1. In 1970, Mr. Harold Adler, a retired manufacturing executive, audited Professor Donovans class, 6.251.
  2. Mr. Stuart Madnick, teaching assistant for 6.251, who was a Ph.d. student and thesis-advisee of Professor Donovans, co-taught workshop sessions.
  3. The course focused on systems programming, relational databases, and operating systems.
  4. In 1971, Mitrol was formed to automate the manufacturers bill-of-materials process. Professor Donovan, Stuart Madnick,( picture ) and their technical team owned 50%,were responsible for the technology Harold Adler and his son, who had no technical experience, were responsible for marketing and owned 50%.( picture harold adler, professor donovan, son James Donovan in Mitrol offices )
  5. Mitrol had successful implementations. In 1973, Harold Adler announced at a board meeting that the company needed additional funding and was going to issue stock to raise money.
  6. Professor Donovan and Stuart Madnick sold their stock to Mr Adler in 1973 for approximately $30,000
  7. Mr Adler sold Mitrol to GE in 1973 to GE for over $9,000,000
  8. GE spun out Mitrol in France as an independent company,

26. Knoware

knoware

1971-1973

Founder, President educational games on the PC

HISTORY:

Knoware, 1971-1973:

Business Environment

  • There was a need for computer education, especially among young people.

Technology Environment

  • Graphics and PCs emerged.

History

  1. In 1971, Knoware was founded by Professor Donovan and Mr. Stuart Madnick.
  2. knoware pioneered an interactive, PC software education using games.
  3. Knoware products won several awards from Computer World and ACM for the best educational software.
  4. For young and old and expandes to other platforms.

27. International Computation (Intercomp)

intercomp

1968-1971

Founder, Chairman, President., sold a clinical laboratory system and hardware interfaces to the IBM 1130 computer to a IBM 2311 disk (developed by Michael Mark), Joseph Alsop, MIT thesis student and research assistant later became president, merged with Logicon, Northrop.

HISTORY:

Intercomp, 1965-1971:

Business Environment

  • Hospitals were beginning to use computers to improve productivity and accuracy.

Technology Environment

  • Applications on small computers were being developed.

History

  1. Professor Donovans Ph.D. thesis in 1966 developed a clinical laboratory system for Yale New Haven Hospital. In 1967, Intercomp was formed with a team of Professor Donovan and three of his MITstudents, Joe Alsop (thesis student, research assistant, teaching assistant), Michael Mark, and Stuart Madnick.(thesis student, teaching assistant)
  2. Intercomp was formed to develop a hospital clinical laboratory system.
  3. To improve the speed of the slow disk system of academic IBM 1130 computer, Michael Mark developed an interface to the fast IBM 2311 disk system.
  4. This interface became a successful product, leading Logican to purchase the company in 1971. Logicon, is now a division of Northrup
## In Addition to the above companies Professor Donovan''s employees have formulated over 30 additioanl companies (including Sapient Jerry Greenberg, Sheeroy Desai, and Stuart Moore (same model as CTG/CTP), Viant, Robert Gett (picture at CTG), Global Crossing Jack Scanlon (picture at CTG), Scient, etc.) with over $100 billion market cap in 2000 and substantially more today.